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    Winston-Salem State University
   
 
  Oct 21, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2015-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Organization of the University


Officers of the University

   
Thomas W. Ross President
Junius J. Gonzales Senior Vice President — Academic Affairs
Kevin M. FitzGerald Chief of Staff
Charlie Perusse Vice President — Finance
Thomas Shanahan Vice President and General Counsel

 

 

Board of Governors

John C. Fennebresque,
Chair

W. Louis Bissette, Jr.,
Vice Chairman

Joan Templeton Perry, M.D.,
Secretary

 

Roger Aiken J. Alex Mitchell
Pearl Burris-Floyd W. G. Champion Mitchell
C. Philip Byers Anna S. Nelson
WAlter C. Davenport R. Doyle Parrish
Hannah D. Gage Therence O. Pickett
Thom Goolsby David M. Powers
H. Frank Grainger Robert S. Rippy
Henry W. Hinton O. Temple Sloan III
James L. Holmes, Jr. Harry L. Smith, Jr.
Rodney E. Hood J. Craig Souza
Zack King George A. Sywassink
Joe Knott  William Webb
W. Marty Kotis III Laura I. Wiley
Scott Lampe Michael Williford
Steven B. Long  
Joan G. MacNeill  
Ann Maxwell  

History of The University of North Carolina

In North Carolina, all the public educational institutions that grant baccalaureate degrees are part of The University of North Carolina. Winston-Salem State University is one of the 16 constituent institutions of the multi-campus state university.

The University of North Carolina, chartered by the N.C. General Assembly in 1789, was the first public university in the United States to open its doors and the only one to graduate students in the eighteenth century. The first class was admitted in Chapel Hill in 1795. For the next 136 years, the only campus of The University of North Carolina was at Chapel Hill.

In 1877, the N.C. General Assembly began sponsoring additional institutions of higher education, diverse in origin and purpose. Five were historically black institutions, and another was founded to educate American Indians. Several were created to prepare teachers for the public schools. Others had a technological emphasis. One was a training school for performing artists.

In 1931, the N.C. General Assembly redefined The University of North Carolina to include three state-supported institutions: the campus at Chapel Hill (now the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), North Carolina State College (now North Carolina State University at Raleigh), and Woman’s College (now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). The new multi-campus university operated with one board of trustees and one president. By 1969, three additional campuses had joined The University through legislative action: the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation bringing into The University of North Carolina the state’s ten remaining public senior institutions, each of which had until then been legally separate:

Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central University, the North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State University. This action created the current 16-campus University. (In 1985, the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, a residential high school for gifted students, was declared an affiliated school of the university; and in 1996 Pembroke State University was renamed the University of North Carolina at Pembroke through legislative action.)

The UNC Board of Governors is the policy-making body legally charged with “the general determination, control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions.” It elects the president, who administers the University. The 32 voting members of the Board of Governors are elected by the General Assembly for four-year terms. Former board chairmen and board members who are former governors of North Carolina may continue to serve for limited periods as non-voting members emeriti. The president of the UNC Association of Student Governments, or that student’s designee, is also a non-voting member.

Each of the 16 constituent institutions is headed by a chancellor, who is chosen by the Board of Governors on the president’s nomination and is responsible to the president. Each institution has a board of trustees, consisting of eight members elected by the Board of Governors, four appointed by the governor, and the president of the student body, who serves ex officio. (The N.C. School of the Arts has two additional ex officio members.) Each board of trustees holds extensive powers over academic and other operations of its institution on delegation from the Board of Governors.

 

 

Board of Trustees

Debra Miller, Chair

Karen McNeil-Miller

Coretta Bigelow

Robert C. Clark

Kelvin Farmer

William U. Harris

Sue Henderson

Pradeep Sharma

Jerry M. Short

Osyris Uqoezwa

Scott F. Wierman

Charles A. Wright

Kyle Brown, President, Student Government Assoc. ex officio

Executive Staff

Elwood Robinson, Ph.D.

Chancellor

Brenda A. Allen, Ph.D.

Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Randy Mills, Ed.D.

Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration

Trae T. Cotten, Ph.D.

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services

Michelle Cook

Vice Chancellor for University Advancement & Executive Director of WSSU Foundation

Camille Kluttz-Leach, J.D.

University Legal Counsel

Tonia Walker

Director of Athletics

Derrick Murray

Associate Provost for Information Resources & CIO

Shannon B. Henry

Director of Internal Audit and Compliance Services

Carolynn B. Berry, Ph.D.

Associate Provost

RaVonda Dalton-Rann

Executive Assistant to the Chancellor & Secretary of the University

Corliss Sellers Executive Assistant to the Chancellor

Academic Affairs

Brenda A. Allen, Ph.D.

Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Carolynn B. Berry, Ph.D.

Associate Provost

Derrick Murray

Associate Provost and Chief Information Officier

Letitia C. Wall

Assistant Provost for Administration and Planning

Deans

Corey Walker, Ph.D.

College of Arts and Sciences

Peggy Valentine, Ed.D.

School of Health Sciences

Doria Stitts, Ph.D.

University College

 

 

Department Chairs

Lynette Wood, Ph.D.
Accounting and Management Information Systems
Craig Richardson, Ph.D.
Economics and Finance
Moula Cherikh, Ph.D.
Management and Marketing
George Harwell, Ph.D.
Clinical Laboratory Science
Elva Jones, Ph.D.
Computer Science
Beth Day-Hairston, Ph.D.
Education
Leonard Muaka, Ph.D.
English
Michael Magruder, Ph.D.
Music
Cynthia Williams Brown, Ph.D.
Health, Physical Education and Sport Studies
Jill Keith, Ph.D.
Biological Sciences
Brian Blount, Ph.D.
Communication and Media Studies
Frank Ingram, Ph.D.
Mathematics
Dorothy Bethea, M.P.A., Ed.D.
Occupational Therapy
Mamadu Yakubu, Ph.D.
Chemistry
Lynn Millar, Ph.D.
Physical Therapy
Denise Nation, Ph.D.
History, Politics and Social Justices
Shannon Mathews, Ph.D.
Behavioral Sciences
Lenora Campbell, Ph.D.
Nursing (Associate Dean)
Montrale Boykin, J.D.
Healthcare Management
LaVie Leasure, Ph.D.
Interdisciplinary Studies
Michele Lewis, Ph.D. Psychological Sciences

 

See the University’s Webpage for Current Listing of Administrators in Administrative and Academic Support Areas