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    Winston-Salem State University
   
 
  Sep 23, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2019

Exercise Science Major, BS


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Program Description

Exercise physiology as an academic discipline is relatively young and is still evolving.  Many credit the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory (1927-1947) as the origin of exercise physiology in the United States.  The physiologists and physicians in that lab were interested in how various occupations and environmental conditions affected the body’s physical performance.  The model of research investigations by the faculty and graduate students in areas that included metabolism, environmental physiology, clinical physiology, aging, blood, nutrition and physical fitness, forms the basis of much of what we know and study today.  More recently fitness and its relationship to preventable disease has driven a large body of research by exercise physiologists.  The field continues to evolve from the study of the role of exercise in performance and disease prevention at the population level to the study of mechanisms at the cellular and genetic levels.  Because of the required science foundation, students are prepared for work in fitness, performance and rehabilitation fields as well as, graduate study in fields that study cellular mechanisms that underlie disease and performance.

Students enrolled in the exercise science major program will examine the physiological changes and adaptations that occur at both the whole body and cellular levels with physical activity and inactivity.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the program, the student will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of human functional anatomy including the skeleton, cardiorespiratory system, skeletal muscle, and sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.
  2. Demonstrate a knowledge of basic exercise physiology including: a) identifying the role of aerobic and anaerobic systems and their required fuels in the performance of various physical activities; b) describing the normal cardiorespiratory responses to an exercise bout and how these responses may differ between subjects of different ages, gender, and ethnicity and with chronic adaptation to exercise; c) identifying the physiological principles related to muscular endurance, strength and flexibility training; d) identifying the effects of temperature, humidity, altitude, and pollution upon the physiological response to exercise; e) identifying neuroendocrine adaptations to exercise; and f) identifying the use and misuse of ergogenic aids to enhance performance.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to identify risk factors and the pathophysiology of the major chronic diseases which may require consultation with medical or allied health professionals prior to participation in physical activity through demonstration of the use of health history, informed consent and medical clearance.
  4. Demonstrate an ability to design exercise programs, which take into account client goals, dose, development and maintenance.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to use knowledge of the basic principles of nutrition, weight control, energy balance and body composition to develop a weight loss program.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to use knowledge of basic statistical and research design to propose and test a research hypothesis.
 

General Major Requirements

Students majoring in exercise science must satisfy the general education course requirements, complete the required major courses outlined and take electives for a minimum total of 120 semester hours (SH) in order to graduate. Where noted, a particular pre-requisite course can be taken as part of the general education (GE) requirements.  A minimum grade of C or better is required in each prerequisite and major course. As part of the general education, students must take BIO 2301/2101 (General Biology and Lab), BIO 2311/2111 and BIO 2312/2112 (Anatomy I and II and labs), as well as EXS 2310 or an equivalent statistics course.

 

 

Major Curriculum

Foundation Courses (19 Semester Hours)

There is a foundation of required courses that forms the basis of the discipline:  anatomy, physiology, exercise physiology and measurement.  At WSSU the following courses are required to lay the foundation for both breadth and depth study.

BIO 2311/2111 Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab* (4 SH)

                (*Pre-requisite:  BIO 2301/2101 General Biology and General Biology Lab (4 SH)) (GE)

BIO 2312/2112 Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab (4 SH)

EXS 2310 Demystifying the Statistics of the Health Sciences or any equivalent Statistics Course (3 SH) (GE)

EXS 3321/3121 Exercise Physiology and Lab (4 SH)

EXS 3411 Functional Anatomy (4 SH)

 

Breadth (16 Semester Hours)

The field of exercise physiology is broad, as was noted in the introduction, and continues to expand.  At WSSU, students are expected to take a course in some specific areas that touch on the breadth of the field.  The five courses marked ** are required while one course is optional.

EXS 3325 Sports Nutrition** (3 SH)

EXS 3315 Biomechanics (3 SH)

EXS 4301/4101 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Lab** (4 SH)

EXS 4314 Sport Psychology** (3 SH)

EXS 4319 Exercise Testing and Prescription** (3 SH)

EXS 4334 Science of Resistance Training** (3 SH)

 

Depth (12-17 Semester Hours)

The exercise science program provides students the opportunity to take one area of the discipline and to go more in depth by taking additional courses.  Based on the expertise of the faculty the program offers three areas of depth or concentration.  Each scholar will select one area from among exercise physiology; fitness and performance; and sports medicine.  The academic advisor will help students determine which area best fits with their goals.

The exercise physiology depth area is designed for individuals seeking to work with the overall health of populations, and provides study in the areas associated with the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines.  Students who want to pursue further study in exercise physiology or in medical fields may be interested in this area.  The fitness and performance concentration is designed for those who seek to use the National Strength and Conditioning Association Guidelines (NSCA) to learn more about how to optimize athletic performance.  The sports medicine concentration is for those minoring in athletic training who seek certification by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA).  These students would be prepared to attend a graduate program and pursue NATA certification.

Exercise Physiology (12 – 15 Semester Hours)

Required Courses:

EXS 4302 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3 SH)

Either EXS 4317 Applied Research or EXS 4321 Sports Supplements (3 SH)

Plus and any other 2 depth courses (6-9 SH)

 

Fitness and Performance (12-15 Semester Hours)

Required Courses:

EXS 3322 Training for Performance (3 SH)

EXS 3310 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 SH)

Plus any 2 other depth courses (6-9 SH)

 

Sports Medicine (sports medicine minor***) (17 Semester Hours if some courses taken in the Foundation or Breadth)

Required Courses:

PED 2205 - Introduction to Sports Medicine (2 SH)                                                

PED 2102 - Introduction to Sports Medicine & Taping Clinical Lab (2 SH)                    

HED 2301 - Nutrition or EXS 33xx Sports Nutrition (3 SH - part of Core)      

EXS 3310 - Prevention & Care of Athletic Injuries (Cross listed with PED 3310) (3 SH)                                                             

EXS 3315 – Biomechanics (3 SH)

PED 3323 - Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries (3 SH)                                                                

EXS 4314 - Sport Psychology (Cross listed with PED 4314) (3 SH - part of Core)                                                                    

PED 4111 - Clinical Experiences in Sports Medicine (1 SH)

PED 4110 - Senior Seminar in Sports Medicine (1 SH)                                                        

PED 4210 - Practicum in Sports Medicine (2 SH)           

***Sports Medicine minors must enroll in PED 4111 for one credit hour for three semesters prior to enrolling in PED 4210 Practicum in Sports Medicine. Students will be required to complete a minimum of 150 hours each of the three semesters (50 hours each semester)

 

Other Courses that can be used as part of a depth study:

EXS 3310 Prevention and Care of Athletic Training (3 SH)

EXS 3315 Biomechanics (3 SH)

EXS 3322 Training for Performance (3 SH)

EXS 4302 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3 SH)

EXS 4317 Applied Research (3 SH)

EXS 4321 Sports Supplements (3 SH)

EXS 4322 Current Topics in EXS (3 SH)

EXS 4612 Internship (6 SH)

HED 4314 Managing Health Promotion Programs (3 SH)

 

Exercise Science Honors Curriculum

An honors curriculum has been developed to address the students’ desire for a more research oriented undergraduate experience, as well as to allow faculty to mentor and develop young researchers in the field.  Students successfully completing the curriculum will graduate with Honors in Exercise Science.

Admission to the honors curriculum is restricted to students who apply and who meet a specified set of criteria.  Application is during the second semester of the student’s junior year and usually occurs while taking the course EXS 4317 Applied Research.  The following minimum criteria will need to be met in order to be admitted to the exercise science honors curriculum.

  1. Successful completion of EXS 4317 Applied Research
  2. A GPA of 3.25 within the major
  3. A cumulative GPA of 3.25
  4. No grade lower than a B in any EXS courses (possible one exception with a strong recommendation by a faculty member)
  5. Identification of a faculty mentor and a potential research project
  6. Recommendation by the Exercise Science Honors screening committee, who will evaluate each applicant on academic merit and professional goals.

The honors curriculum consists of two additional required courses, one each semester of the senior year.  During semester one, students will enroll in the course “Directed Honors Research Investigations in EXS”.  During the last semester, students will enroll in “Honors Thesis in EXS”.  In order to graduate with honors, the student must still meet the GPA standards set at admission, successfully complete both courses, and successfully prepare and defend a thesis.  Students admitted to the honors curriculum may choose any of the three depth areas.

Required Courses (count as depth courses)

EXS 4330 Directed Honors Research in EXS (3 SH)

EXS 4325 Honors Thesis in EXS (3 SH)

 

Notes:

Exercise science is a great major for those planning to apply to a graduate program in the health sciences, including but not limited to medicine, physical therapy and occupational therapy.

Pre-Physical Therapy

Students who plan to apply to a graduate program in physical therapy will need to take additional courses as electives, many of which can be taken as part of general education.  The WSSU Physical Therapy program requires the following courses for admissions consideration.  Not all programs are the same and thus students should always look at the requirements of the program of interest.

 

COURSE SUBJECT

COURSE LEVEL

4-YR *

LAB**

SEMESTER HOURS

ACCEPTABLE COURSES

Psychology

General or College

NO

N/A

3

Psychology: GENERAL

Social or Behavioral Science

General or College

NO

N/A

6

Psychology: Abnormal
Psychology: Adolescent
Psychology: Child
Psychology: Death & Dying
Psychology: Developmental
Psychology: Human Behavior
Psychology: Growth & Dev.
Psychology: Life Span Dev.
Psychology: Social
Psychology: Sports

Statistics

General or College

NO

N/A

3

Biology: Biostatistics
Business: Statistics
Math: Statistics
Psychology: Statistics

Chemistry I

General or College

NO

REQ

4

 

Chemistry II

General or College

NO

REQ

4

 

Physics I

General or College

NO

REQ

4

 

Physics II

General or College

NO

REQ

4

 

Anatomy & Physiology I

General or College

NO

REQ

4

A&P: SEPARATE courses
A&P: COMBINED courses
A&P: Human
A&P: Mammalian

Anatomy & Physiology II

General or College

NO

REQ

4

A&P: SEPARATE courses
A&P: COMBINED courses
A&P: Human
A&P: Mammalian

Biology I

General or College

NO

REQ

4

Biology: GENERAL

OTHER: Upper Level Biology

Upper Division

YES

NO

3-4

A&P: Exercise Physiology
A&P: Pathophysiology
Biology: Embryology
Biology: Genetics
Biology: Histology
Biology: Immunology
Biology: Microbiology
Biology: Molecular
Chemistry: Inorganic
Chemistry: Organic
Kinesiology

 

* YES=course must be completed in a 4-year college/university and NOT in a community college.
** REQ=required lab; Rec=recommended lab; NO=lab not required; N/A=not applicable

Additional information about program’s course requirements: WSSU requires that all biological and physical sciences are taken in the past 10 years; they are Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, Anatomy and Physiology I and II, and Upper Level Biology.

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